405 Frederick Road, Suite 150, Catonsville, MD 21228
 

 


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Angel Dental Care
405 Frederick Road, Suite 150
Catonsville, MD 21228
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Posts for: September, 2016

By Angel Dental Care
September 23, 2016
Category: Oral Health
DrTravisStorkDontIgnoreBleedingGums

Are bleeding gums something you should be concerned about? Dear Doctor magazine recently posed that question to Dr. Travis Stork, an emergency room physician and host of the syndicated TV show The Doctors. He answered with two questions of his own: “If you started bleeding from your eyeball, would you seek medical attention?” Needless to say, most everyone would. “So,” he asked, “why is it that when we bleed all the time when we floss that we think it’s no big deal?” As it turns out, that’s an excellent question — and one that’s often misunderstood.

First of all, let’s clarify what we mean by “bleeding all the time.” As many as 90 percent of people occasionally experience bleeding gums when they clean their teeth — particularly if they don’t do it often, or are just starting a flossing routine. But if your gums bleed regularly when you brush or floss, it almost certainly means there’s a problem. Many think bleeding gums is a sign they are brushing too hard; this is possible, but unlikely. It’s much more probable that irritated and bleeding gums are a sign of periodontal (gum) disease.

How common is this malady? According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, nearly half of all  Americans over age 30 have mild, moderate or severe gum disease — and that number increases to 70.1 percent for those over 65! Periodontal disease can occur when a bacteria-rich biofilm in the mouth (also called plaque) is allowed to build up on tooth and gum surfaces. Plaque causes the gums to become inflamed, as the immune system responds to the bacteria. Eventually, this can cause gum tissue to pull away from the teeth, forming bacteria-filled “pockets” under the gum surface. If left untreated, it can lead to more serious infection, and even tooth loss.

What should you do if your gums bleed regularly when brushing or flossing? The first step is to come in for a thorough examination. In combination with a regular oral exam (and possibly x-rays or other diagnostic tests), a simple (and painless) instrument called a periodontal probe can be used to determine how far any periodontal disease may have progressed. Armed with this information, we can determine the most effective way to fight the battle against gum disease.

Above all, don’t wait too long to come in for an exam! As Dr. Stork notes, bleeding gums are “a sign that things aren’t quite right.”  If you would like more information about bleeding gums, please contact us or schedule an appointment. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bleeding Gums.” You can read the entire interview with Dr. Travis Stork in Dear Doctor magazine.


By Angel Dental Care
September 09, 2016
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crowns   bridges  

Versatile crowns and bridges are used to address a variety of dental issues. Dr. M.S. Warshanna, your Catonsville, MD dentist at Angel crowns and bridgesDental Care discusses when crowns and bridges are needed.

What are crowns?

Crowns are hollow tooth restorations that cover a tooth completely. They're often made of materials that closely resemble tooth enamel, such as porcelain, porcelain-fused-to-metal, ceramic or resin. Crowns may also be made of other gold, nickel or other metal alloys.

Your dentist in Catonsville, MD may recommend a crown to:

  • Stabilize Your Tooth: Crowns prevent chips or cracks from turning into breaks and restore teeth damaged by fractures. They're also recommended if you've had a large filling or root canal therapy. Although these treatments keep your teeth healthy, they can also weaken teeth and make them more likely to break.
  • Hide Discolorations: A discolored tooth can make you feel self-conscious about your smile. Discolorations can occur if your tooth has been stained by tetracycline use or discolored due to a previous infection or a dental procedure. Since your new crown encases your tooth, the discoloration will no longer be noticeable.
  • Lengthen Teeth: Whether your tooth is naturally short or became too short due to grinding, a crown can be used to lengthen the tooth, restoring your ability to bite and chew normally.
  • Improve the Appearance of Oddly Shaped Teeth: When a tooth looks a little odd or is slightly crooked, crowns provide a simple way to improve your appearance.

What are bridges?

Bridges are used to replace missing teeth. They consist of one or more false teeth, called pontics, that are attached to crowns on either end. The crowns slip over your teeth, anchoring the bridge in place. Bridges get their name from their ability to span the gap that occurs after tooth loss. Bridges are usually made of porcelain or porcelain-fused-to-metal.

Could you benefit from crowns and bridges? Contact Dr. Warshanna at Angel Dental Care in Catonsville, MD. Call (410) 747-0077 to schedule an appointment to discuss the best restoration for you. Improve your smile with crowns and bridges!


By Angel Dental Care
September 08, 2016
Category: Oral Health
TreatingBurningMouthDependsonWhatsTriggeringit

There's a burning sensation in your mouth even though you haven't had anything hot to eat or drink. It's an experience you've had for years, often accompanied by mouth dryness, tingling or numbness that leaves you irritable, anxious or depressed.

The root causes for Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) remain elusive, although there appear to be links to diabetes, acid reflux, menopausal hormonal changes or even psychological issues. Although we may not be able to pinpoint the root cause we can identify contributing factors to BMS through a detailed oral examination and medical history (including drugs you're taking).

Mouth dryness is one of the most common factors for BMS. The lack of lubrication from adequate saliva flow can contribute substantially to the irritating burning sensation. There are a number of causes for mouth dryness, including as a side effect from many medications or other treatments.

We must also consider whether an allergic reaction — the body's over-reaction to a foreign substance — may have a role in your symptoms. Some people react to sodium lauryl sulfate, a foaming agent found in many types of toothpaste, along with whitening substances or flavorings like cinnamon; denture wearers can become allergic to the plastic materials used to construct the denture. These, as well as spicy foods, smoking or alcohol, can irritate or cause the tissues lining the inside of the mouth to peel.

Determining what factors contribute to your symptoms allows us to develop a treatment approach tailored to your situation. If, for example, we've determined your BMS stems from dry mouth as a side effect to medication, we can ask your doctor to prescribe an alternative, increase your water intake when taking pills or stimulate saliva flow. If we identify an allergen as a factor, you can eliminate the substance to reduce symptoms.

You may also need to make changes to your eating and lifestyle habits: stop smoking, reduce your alcohol or coffee consumption and avoid very hot or spicy foods. And look for ways to reduce stress, another contributing factor, through relaxation techniques, exercise or support groups.

It's possible that BMS will resolve itself over time. In the meantime, though, we can help you find ways to alleviate the irritation.

If you would like more information on diagnosing and treating BMS, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Burning Mouth Syndrome.”